Health and Safety Policy

Health & Safety Manual

Chapter 1-General

1. General

1.1 Purpose

1.1.1 This manual provides guidelines for the preparation of a company's safety and health system

1.1.2 The objectives of this manual are to

a) highlight the important aspects of safety and health protection to assist company in planning implementing and auditing management system in order to satisfy company, legal and social obligations and

b) Assist to put in place safe work practice and management system to enhance their safety performance.

1.2 Scope

The procedures in this manual are applicable to product development, procurement, manufacture, sales, transport, use and disposal of agrochemicals produced by the company.

1.3 Responsibility

1) Managing Director (All Business Units)

2) Directors (HSE)

3) Managers

4) GM

5) Supervisors

6) Staffs

7) Factory Labors

1.4 Forms and Reference

a) Occupational Safety and Health Assessment Series 18001

b) OHSA PPE

1.5 Procedure- General

1.5.1 The structure of this manual is similar to that of the above standards which are representative of Safety and Health Management Systems.

1.5.2 Similar to these standards, the Plan-Do-Check-Act continual improvement framework has been adopted for this manual.

1.6 Promoting Safety Culture in workplace

1.6.1 It is the responsibility of the top management to provide all assistance to the HSE duty officer in order that they are able to promote workplace safety culture.

1.6.2 The HSE personnel must endeavor to maintain a good working relationship with all staff members.

1.6.3 This can be done by involving all employees in toolbox meeting, regular inspection, and by actively considering and acting upon the feedback given by them.

1.6.4 Where HSE Officers observes lapses in safe working practices, he must be consulted & implemented.

1.6.5 Risk assessment and guidance provided in this Manual must be consulted & implemented.

1.6.6 Behavior based safety must be promoted in workplace.

1.6.7 Health and safety standards of the company can be significantly enhanced by increasing awareness and highlighting benefits of safe work practices.

1.7 Reporting

1.7.1 The employee is required to the HSE Department in case of following occurrence:

a) Occupational injuries, accidents

b) Unsafe conditions at work

c) Any injury that renders a worker unfit for more than 3 days

d) Hospitalization of an employee for over 24 hours

1.8 Housekeeping

1.8.1 Good housekeeping is a basic requirements that promotes and maintains the work environment and employee in a healthy and safe condition.

1.8.2 Cleanliness standards must be maintained at a high level.

1.8.3 All ventilators/dampers must be stenciled with name of space they service.

1.8.4 Offices, production lines, warehouses, toilets & washrooms must be kept clean, inspected weekly and results logged.

1.9 Related Documents/Forms

* Weekly HSE Inspection Checklist

* Monthly HSE Monitoring Report


2.0 Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment

2.1 Purpose & Scope

This procedure is applicable to

1) address the risks and opportunities as determined

2) Assess the risk from chemicals or processes at workplace

3) Implement Control actions to eliminate or reduce the risk.

2.2 Responsibilities

2.2.1 All managers are responsible to participate in identifying the hazard associated with their work-related process.

2.2.2 The Regular Meeting body shall review the significant risks and impacts at management review meeting and shall consider the various control measures to eliminate or reduce the risk..

2.3. Hazard ID & Risk Assessment

2.3.1 Risk Assessment

a) A 'Risk Assessment' is intended to be a careful examination of what, in the nature of operation, could cause harm, so the decisions can be made as to whether enough precautions have been taken or where more should be done to prevent harm. The aim is to minimize accidents and ill health at workplace.

b) Risk assessment should be seen as a continuous process. In practice, the risks in the workplace should be assessed before work begins on any task.

2.4 Identify the Hazard

2.4.1 Answers to following sample questions will assist

2.4.2 Who or what could be harmed

2.4.3 How could harm occur?

2.5 Determine the Risk

2.5.1 The risk from the hazard is determined by estimating

a) The potential severity of the harm

b) The likelihood that harm will occur

2.5.2 When determining the likelihood of harm the adequacy of control measure already in place shall be considered.

2.5.3 Thus, if a proper procedure is followed harm is less likely to occur.

2.6 Decide if the risk is tolerable

2.6.1 If the risk is tolerable, additional safety precaution will need to be taken.

2.6.2 On a practical level, whenever a task is being given the person giving the tasks must evaluate the risks and determine what safety precautions need to be taken

2.6.3 It is a good practice to discuss the safety precautions prior starting of a task, even if the persons carrying out the task are experienced personnel. It reduced the likelihood of accidents considerably.

2.7 Types of Hazards

A hazard is a source of potential harm or damage or a situation with potential for harm or damage. Hazard encountered in workplace may be the following;

a) Chemical hazards

b) Physical hazards

c) Biological hazards

d) Ergonomic hazards

e) Psychological hazards

2.8: Please review diagram in full policy

2.9: Existing Risk Control

Risk Control is the process of determining the best available means of implementing measures whereby the likelihood and/or the severity is reduced. The preferred means is to eliminate the hazard in the first instance. Where this is not possible, the risk posed by the hazard must be minimized

2.9.1 Elimination- elimination of toxic substances, hazardous plant or processes that are not absolutely necessary to the system of work

2.9.2 Substitution- Substituting a toxic substance, hazardous plant or process with one known to be harmful to health. Substitution is only a preferred control method. It may also be the least expensive.

2.9.3 Isolation- enclosing or isolating a hazard such as a toxic substance, plant or process from employees, to eliminate or reduce the risk of injury or illness. Using a noise enclosure booth is an example of separating employees from excessive noise levels.

2.9.4 Engineering Controls- changing processes, equipment or tools for example

a) machine guards and machine operation controls,

b) Changing layout of work areas to minimize bending and twisting during manual handling

2.9.5 Administrative Controls- changing work procedures to reduce exposure to existing hazards. For example:

a) Reducing time of exposure to hazards by job rotation

b) Limiting the number of employers exposed to the hazard by limiting access to hazardous area.

2.9.6 Personal Protective Clothing (PPE)

Devices and clothing that provide individual employees with some protection from hazards. All effective protective clothing and equipment system requires considerable effort by the employer to ensure that:

a) proper protective devices are selected

b) where necessary, employees are individually fitted.

c) proper instruction on the need for, and use of PPE is provided.

d) standards are enforced

e) an effective system of cleaning and maintenance is devised.

Further down the scale controls, the risk still exists. Administrative controls and PPE provide interim solutions in a planned program to eliminate or reduce a particular risk or they may be used in addition to other control methods.

2.10 Risk Matrix

2.10.1 Likelihood & Severity

Likelihood of Occurrence

Severity of impact

(1) Rare- So unlikely it can be assumed that occurrence may not be experienced (1) Insignificant (No impact)

(2) Unlikely- Not likely to occur in Company but probable (2) Minor (little effect)

(3) Likely to occur sometimes in Company (<3/year) (3) Moderate (May pose a problem)

(4) Likely to occur several time in Company (4-10/year) (4) Major

(5) Likely to occur repeatedly in Company (>10/year) (5) Catastrophic

2.10.2 Risk Rating

Low Risk

Acceptable Risk: Work Procedure Normal <=3

Medium Risk: Acceptable Risk0 Exercise Caution with these hazards 4-12

High Risk: Unacceptable Risk- Work cannot proceed till further control measures


3.0 Permit-to-Work

3.1 Purpose and Scope

To give instruction and guidelines for permit application for the following work;

1) Working at height

2) Maintenance of machinery

3) Electrical system and equipment

4) Cargo Load On/Off

5) Hot Work/ Welding

6) Entry into confined space

3.2 Responsibilities

All personnel including permanent employees, temporary and seasonal workers and subcontractors

3.3 Procedure

3.3.1 Permit-to-Work System

All sub-contractors must strictly follow the information given in Permit-To-Work and sign Master Agreement with Myanma Awba Group

a) Detailed visual inspections should be carried out by a competent person and formally recorded using HSE-FF-12 Permit to Work Form.

b) If safety condition is satisfactory, HSE Department issue Permit-to-work certificate which clearly state the period of validity, location and details of work to be done, the nature, and the results of any preliminary test undertaken, the measures taken to make the job safe and any safeguards to be taken during operation

c) Only the work specified on the permit should be undertaken. The permit should be recognised as an overriding instruction until it is cancelled i.e. the person involved should not be diverted to other tasks.

d) Before signing the permit, the responsible officer should personally check that all the measures specified as necessary have in fact been taken and that safety arrangements will be maintained until the permit is cancelled.

e) The person responsible for carrying out the specified work should countersign the permit to indicate his understanding of the safety precautions to be observed. On completion of the work he should notify the authorising officer.

3.4 Related Document

* HSE-FF-12 Permit-to-Work Form


4.0 Working at Height

4.1 Purpose

To give instruction, guidelines and considerations to be adopted by all personnel who are required to work at height

4.2 Scope

This procedure applies to all employees and contractors of Myanma Awba Group, at all locations of work within or without the confines of the Myanma Awba Group's Rules & Regulations.

4.3 Responsibilities

All personnel including permanent employees, temporary and seasonal workers and subcontractors must strictly follow the safe work practice as described in this procedure.

The concerned department Manager or Supervisor shall notify the HSE Manager once he/ she observe anyone performs duties against to safe working practice and HSE Manager shall take appropriate disciplinary action accordingly.

4.4 Definitions

i Working at height Work includes moving around at a place of work but not travel to or from a place of work- A place is at height if a person could be injured falling from it.

ii Fall arrest System means equipment and/or material that is designed for the purpose of preventing or reducing the severity of injury to a person in the event of a fall such as safety harness system. Safety belts are generally used in a travel restraint system and not as fall arrest system

iii. Work restraint or Travel Restraint system means methods of preventing a person from reaching beyond the safe work zone within which he will not be in falling. For example, safety belt attached to a suitable lifeline.

iv Fall Protection System means material and/or equipment that are designed for the purpose of preventing a person falling from height such as scaffolds and mobile elevated work platforms

v Hazardous Work at Height Hazardous work at height means work-

a) in or on an elevated workplace from which a person could fall

b) in the vicinity of an opening through which a person could fall

c) in the vicinity of an edge over which a person could fall

d) on a surface through which a person could fall or

e) on a surface through which a person could fall or

f) in any other place (whether above or below ground) from which a person could fall, a distance more than 3 meters

4.5 Procedure-Work at height

1) Prior to working at height, a risk assessment is to be carried out to establish what health and safety measures need to be adopted to avoid or reduce risk. Consideration shall be given to

a) The physical condition of people involved

b) The activity

c) The equipment to be used

d) The location- is it near water, close to power cables, etc.

e) The condition and stability of the work area and surfaces

f) The duration of work

2) Workers must follows Rules to prevent falling

a) Make sure the working platform is secure that

 Will support the weight of workers using it and any materials and equipment they are likely to use on it

 Is stable and is not overturn, For example, scaffolding needs to be tied to a supporting structure. Mobile elevating work platforms may not be safe on sloping ground

* Provide adequate working space and

* Is footed on stable ground or on a stable support or structure

b) Provide guardrails, barriers, etc. at open edges including edges of floors, decks, roofs, floor or openings and edges of working platforms

3) Protecting against falling materials

The risk of falling materials causing injury should be minimised by;

* Barricading the area below any work at height and posting signage to warn others of the potential danger.

* Keeping work platform clear of loose materials

* Provide means of preventing materials and other objects rolling, or being kicked off the edges of platforms

* Register of tools/portable equipment to be brought to work at height are to be formulated and maintained by the responsible in charge

* All tools/equipment shall be inspected (not loose, corroded, or damaged, etc) prior to use

* Tools/equipment shall be taken in appropriate containment kit (tool bag, pouches, etc).

* While work at height with heavy items is on-going, the “Drop Zone” below the work site should need to be barricaded off if need be evaluated by risk assessment

4) Mobile Elevating Working Platform

a) Mobile elevating work platforms (MEWPs) can provide excellent safe access to high level work. When using MEWP make sure that

* Whosoever is operating it is fully trained and competent

* The work platform is provided with guard rails and toe boards

* It is used on firm and level ground

* It’s tyres are correctly inflated

* Any outriggers are extended and choked as necessary before raising the platform and

* Everyone knows what to do if the machine fails with the platforms in the raised positions

b) Do not

* Operate MEWP’s close to overhead cables or dangerous machinery

* Allow a knuckle, or allow of the arm to protrude into a traffic route when working near vehicles,

* Move the equipment with platform in the raised position unless the equipment is designed to allow this to be done safely.

c) All personnel within working platform must use a harness with a fall restraint at all times

Ladders

a) In any cases, ladders should be secured against movement and supported from a firm, level and non-slip surface.

b) If series of ladders are used to gain access to a surface, landing platforms should be provided at every 6 m interval.

c) Fall arrest system must be used by persons using a ladder as working surface.

d) When climbing/descending vertically a ladder, the three point contact rule shall be followed. One hand and two feet, or two hands and one foot should always be in contact with the ladder.

e) Ladders should not be used

* On working platforms to gain height above the protected edge

* In access areas within the arc of swinging doors

* To support a working platform

* After something has changed (ie ladder dropped or moved from one area to another)

f) Ladders should be subject to pre-use checks to be carried out by user before use and after something has changed (i.e ladder dropped or moved from a dirty area to a clean area.

g) Detailed visual inspections should be carried out by a competent person every week and formally recorded on HSE-CHL-003 Weekly Safety Inspection Checklist Form.

4.6 Related Document

* HSE-CHL-003 Weekly Inspection Checklist

* HSE-FF-012 Permit –to-Work Form


5.0 Maintenance of Machinery

5.1 Purpose

To ensure that workshop machinery is maintained in a good, safe condition and that it is used in a safe manner at all times

5.2 Scope

The procedure relates to the maintenance and use of all plant machinery such as Wolf filling and packaging machines, Inline filling, capping, labelling, induction, shrinking machines, mixed blended, granulated formulation plant, pneumatic and hydraulic tools and appliances installed within the Manufacturing Plants of Myanma Awba Group

5.3 Responsibility

All personnel including permanent employees, temporary and seasonal workers and subcontractors must strictly follow the safe working practices as described in this procedure.

The Maintenance Engineer, Manager or Supervisor shall notify the HSE Manager once he/ she observe anyone performs duties against to safe working practice and HSE Manager shall take appropriate disciplinary action

5.4 Procedure

5.4.1 General

i. Maintenance work on MAG Manufacturing Plants must not be carried out by any person other than a trainer and competent person authorised to do so by the Maintenance Department Manager.

ii. All operators must be aware of the hazards involved with operating each particular machine and how to stop the machine in an emergency.

iii. Any damage or malfunction must be reported immediately to the Maintenance Department for rectification, in such cases the machine must be stopped, switched off at its power source, and assign must be affixed stating 'Do Not Use Of Order'.

iv. Do not distract or interfere with any person who is operating a machine. If you are the operator, maintain concentration on the work being carried out.

v. Do not leave a machine unattended while it is running, wait for the machine to come to a complete stop before leaving

vi. Do not attempt to stop a machine with your hands or the body.

vii. Suitable eye protection, goggles or full-face visor must be worn at all times while operating a machine or when near to a machine that is being operated

viii. Ensure that potential hazards such as loose clothing, gloves, jewelry, long hair and materials projecting from pockets cannot come into contact with moving parts.

ix. Do not reach around or over, moving parts of a machine or the work being machines.

5.4.2 Machinery Guarding and Safety Devices

i. In general all moving parts of machinery and equipment shall be effectively guarded to prevent persons from coming into contact with them.

ii. Whenever fitted all machines guards and safety devices must be in place and used at all times. Whenever fitted guards are removed or fitted safety devices are inoperable, the power to the machine is to be isolated and tagged accordingly.

iii. All new machines purchased and installed within MAG's Manufacturing Plant must comply with the latest international standards with regard to guards and safety devices. Further, the manufacturer must be requested to supply a risk assessment for the machine being supplied.

iv. Where it is not reasonably practicable to retrofit guards or safety devices to such machines, other reasonably practicable measures are to be introduced to safeguard the operator and often in the vicinity of the machine.

5.5 Related Document

* Machine Master List

* Maintenance Schedule & Checklist for machineries


6.0 Electrical System & Equipment

6.1 Purpose

To ensure that procedure are in place to prevent electrocution and/or fires resulting from electrical connection or equipment.

6.2 Scope

i. This procedure covers the supply of electric power directly to equipment onsite and the use of electrical equipment used on site

ii. In addition this procedure will cover the safe isolation of all electrical installations and distributions networks that are being maintained, repaired or modified in buildings, production line, warehouse throughout MAG premises

iii. It will specify the process of “Lock out, Test and Tag Out” as a means to satisfy control the risk associated with the inadvertent energising of any electrical system.

6.3 Definition

i. PAT Portable Appliance Testing

ii. LOTTO Lock Out-Test-Tag Out

iii. Lock Out The placement of a lock out device on an emergency isolation device, in accordance with the established procedure, for ensuring that the energy isolating device and the machine being controlled cannot be operated until the lock out device is removed.

iv. Lock Out Device A device that utilizes a positive means such as a lock, either key or combination type, to hold an energy isolation device in the safe position and prevent energitization of a machine

6.4 Responsibility

All personnel including permanent employees, temporary and seasonal workers and subcontractors must strictly follow the safe working practices as described in this procedure.

The Maintenance Engineer, Manager or Supervisor shall notify the HSE Manager once he/ she observe anyone performs duties against to safe working practice and HSE Manager shall take appropriate disciplinary action

6.5 Procedure

6.5.1 General

i. Maintenance Department shall provide and maintain all electrical installation and equipment of good construction and sound materials, free from defects, and in accordance with the generally accepted principles of sound and safe practice.

ii. Plugs and socket- outlets used for connection any electrical equipment shall be of heavy duty industrial types.

iii. It is strictly forbidden for any person other than those authorised within the Maintenance Department to interfere with those power supplies

iv. All precautions must be taken to avoid damage to power cables and any damage which may occur is found, must be immediately reported to the Maintenance Department.

v. Power supply must be isolated prior to any work commencing upon an electrical installation The isolation must be proved 'dead' by competent electrical officer using suitably approved and calibrated test equipment, e.g. Digital Multimeter, Electrical Test Pen or Contact Free Voltage Tester which is fitted with audible beeper and flashing red LED voltage indicator.

vi. The only exception to this requirement is when it is necessary to carry out electrical work in a 'live' condition, e.g. testing or maintenance work. However all necessary precautions must be taken in line with the appropriate risk assessment.

6.5.2 Procedure on site

i. Do not interfere with or attempt to repair any electrical equipment, machinery or tools.

ii. Repair all faults or breakdowns immediately to either the Maintenance Department.

iii. All switchboard, distribution boards, sub-stations and similar installation must be kept clear of obstructions at all times.

iv. No person is permitted to enter any electrical sub-station or room containing high voltage electrical equipment/unless authorised to do so by the Maintenance Department Manager.

v. Protection against contact with electrical power must be provided in all installations where the operating voltage exceeds 55V AC to earth.

vi. Only MAG electrical equipment, which are inspected and certified can be directly to the MAG electrical system, unless with prior approval of the Maintenance Department Manager.

vii. Equipment brought into the MAG premises by any subcontractor must be inspected and approved by maintenance department and only the equipment, which is manufactured to a recognised standard.

viii. All portable electrical equipment must be properly earthed and must be periodically inspected for damage. Plug ad sockets must be used at all times for connections.

ix. Operators of any electrical equipment must be trained and fully competent in its use.

6.5.3 Portable Electrical Equipment

i. Contractors are strictly forbidden to take electrical equipment or tools on site without first having such equipment inspected by Maintenance Department.

ii. Once the inspection has been completed and Maintenance Department are satisfied that the equipment or tools are of good construction and safe to use, they will attach an inspection sticker and allow the equipment or tools to be connected to the electrical systems.

iii. Any portable electrical equipment used shall be operated at a voltage not exceeding alternating current (AC) 55 volts between the conductor and earth or direct current 110volts. In exceptional circumstances where the use of supply greater than 110 volts is unavoidable, approval to use such equipment or tools in factory must be sought from the factory HSE Department.

iv. All temporary electrical installation supplying electricity to any portable electrical equipment shall be protected by effective residual circuit breakers with a tripping current (sensitivity) of not exceeding 30 milliamps (mA)

v. The low voltage shock preventer shall be fitted in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. The low voltage shock shall be inspected and tested by a competent person once every 6 months.

vi. Welding equipment brought on site by contractor must be 440 V AC with the secondary voltage being DC.

vii. In areas when flammable vapours may be present, intrinsically safe equipment and fittings must be used

6.5.4 High or Medium Voltage Electrical Systems or Equipment

i. All high or medium voltage electrical system or equipment or building used specifically to house high or medium voltage electrical systems or equipment must display appropriate warning signs.

ii. Unauthorized persons are not to:

iii. In the event of breakdown, malfunction or damage to high or medium voltage electrical systems or equipment, Maintenance Department must be informed immediately.

iv. Maintenance Department personnel must not attempt to repair or otherwise interfere with high or medium electrical voltage systems or equipment unless specifically authorized to do so try the Maintenance Engineer.

v. When working on high or medium voltage electrical system or equipment, authorized Maintenance Department personnel must strictly adhere to Maintenance Department Instruction.

6.5.4 High or Medium Voltage Electrical Systems or Equipment

i. All high or medium voltage electrical system or equipment or building used specifically to house high or medium voltage electrical systems or equipment must display appropriate warning signs.

ii. Unauthorized persons are not to:

iii. In the event of breakdown, malfunction or damage to high or medium voltage electrical systems or equipment, Maintenance Department must be informed immediately.

iv. Maintenance Department personnel must not attempt to repair or otherwise interfere with high or medium electrical voltage systems or equipment unless specifically authorized to do so try the Maintenance Engineer.

v. When working on high or medium voltage electrical system or equipment, authorized Maintenance Department personnel must strictly adhere to Maintenance Department Instruction.

6.5.5 Temporary Disconnection of Power Supply

i. In case alternative power supplies is required to complete on site, Department Manager are to ensure that such request (Lock out and Tag out Notification) is forwarded to Maintenance Department in good time.

ii. Power supply will be isolated at appropriate sub-station, with the breaker being padilocked and tagged by the Maintenance Department. The person in charge of the isolation for Maintenance Department will retain the padilock key. Sub-station doors are also locked shut.

6.6 Related Document

* HSE-CHL-001 General Safety Checklist

* HSE-CHL-003 HSE Weekly Checklist

* HSE-CHL-005 Generator Safety Checklist

* HSE-CHL-006 Electrical Safety Checklist

7.0 Requirement for Procurement

7.1 Purpose

To ensure that all new plant and capital equipment is purchased with an in debt understanding of all relevant Occupational Health and Safety issues and that all future Safety Maintenance is conducted to address any issues known.

7.2 Scope

This procedure relates to the purchase of all new plant, capital equipment and all machine equipment. This procedure does not cover the purchase of hand or portable tools

7.3 Procedure

i. When the need for any new plant, capital equipment or machine equipment is identified, Occupational Health and Safety issues such as equipment must considered at the outset.

ii. When first approaching potential suppliers, the equipment of this procedure are to be made known of them.

iii. The supplier of any new plant, capital equipment or machine equipment is to supply the following information as a minimum.

a) A fully documented and independently verified Failure Mode and Critical Analysis (or equivalent) relating to all system, Sub systems, Modules and Components- identifying all safety critical items. Reliability data is to be provided for all identified safety critical items.

b) All relevant Occupational Health, Safety and Environmental issues.

c) Recommended test examination and maintenance protocols including method statements,

d) Regular updates as new information becomes available.

iv. The above requirements are to be communicated to the supplier in writing and are to be included on the Purchase Order to form part of the contract.

7.4 Related Document

* QMS- System Procedure Purchasing

8.0 Entry into Confined Space

8.1 Purpose

To provide a record of all personnel in confined/enclosed space to ensure that in the event of emergency complete evacuation can be quickly confirmed.

8.2 Scope

Control of entry into confined space, contractors, customers all workers, services engineers and visitors

8.3 Definitions

i. Confined Space- a place which is substantially, though not always entirely, enclosed and where there is a risk that anyone who may enter the space could be:

* Oxygen deficiency

* Poisonous vapours

* Flammability

* Corrosive chemicals

8.4 Responsibility

All personnel including permanent employees, temporary and seasonal workers and subcontractors must strictly follow the safe working practices as described in this procedure. HSE Manager, HSE Supervisor

8.5 Procedure to Confined Space Entry

i. A Risk Assessment should be carried out by responsible supervisor requesting entry permit. All the hazards and risk associated with work activity must be considered and appropriate control measures must be installed.

ii. Responsible person shall arrange adequate lighting and ventilation space. Responsible supervisor shall highlight work activity and raise request for Entry into Confined Space by filling up Permit to Work Form (HSE-FF-012). Requester must ensure that all safety measures are complied with before application is handed over to HSE Department

iii. Competent HSE Personnel shall then inspect the confined space and when it is confirmed that the confined space is safe for Entry, the HSE department shall endorse the Permit-to-Work form for Entry into Confined Space.

iv. If the work is performed by a subcontractor, he must acknowledge and agree to the terms and conditions of the permit.

v. The HSE Officer shall carry out periodic testing of the atmosphere and maintain record of the test.

vi. During work in confined space at least one competent person among a group must be equipped with a valid portable Gas Detector and a whistle, PGD shall be always kept in ON position at all time.

vii. In car of any abnormal readings or if the alarm of PGD is activated, PGD holder must alert everyone in confined and space must be evacuated at once.

viii. Confined Space Attendant shall maintain a regular contact with persons working inside confined space.

ix. In event of emergency Confined Space Attended shall summon Emergency Response Team and assists persons working inside confined space to evacuate.

x. Rescue shall be done by ERT as described in HSE-SP-01 Emergency Response Procedure.

xi. Once work in confined space is completed, the Supervisor shall remove all equipment and evacuate all persons from confined space.

xii. The HSE Officer shall keep the copy of filling and record keeping. He must also ensure that a 'No Entry Sign' is displayed at confined space entrance.

xiii. If there is no sign at the entrance of a space or there is doubt about the condition of a space, then entry is forbidden until HSE personnel has checked or re-checked the condition.

xiv. Personnel must never enter a confined space alone. It is strictly forbidden to enter any confined space without first depositing Permit-To-Work Card at the appropriate rack.

xv. Access Passes must be removed from the rack immediately upon existing or evacuating the confined space.

xvi. If in an emergency, an individual evacuates a confined space from a different opening or access from that which they entered, every effort should be made, without endangerment to the individual, to remove the Access Pass from the original point of entry.

8.6 Related Document

* HSE-FF-12 Permit- to-Work Form

9.0 Personal Protective Clothing PPE

9.1 Purpose

To ensure that all necessary PPE is made available, maintained and used correctly where required and that it conforms to recognized international standards. The provision of PPE will comply with local and international guidelines.

9.2 Scope

This procedure relates to the type and standard of PPE to be used within MAG's premises by employees, contractors and visitors. It also contains guidance on situations where the wearing of PPE is required and areas within MAG factory where the wearing of PPE is mandatory.

9.3 Definitions

i. PPE Personal Protective Equipment can be summarily classified as;

a) Head protection (safety helmets, hair protection);

b) Hearing protection;

c) Face and eye protection (goggles and spectacles, facial shields)

d) Respiratory protective equipment (dust masks, respirators, breathing apparatus)

e) Hand and foot protection (gloves, safety boots and shoes);

f) Body protection (safety suits, safety belts, harnesses, aprons);

ii. Approved standards NS, DIN, ANSI, etc.

9.4 Procedure

9.4.1 General

i. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is used throughout industry as means of safeguarding workers from a wide range of health and safety hazards at work, such as exposure of toxic fumes or extreme temperatures, being stuck by falling objects or being splashed by hazardous liquid.

ii. However, it must be made clear that PPE should be the last choice of risk control as per hierarchy of control measures.

ii. The company shall provide suitable PPE for all employees protective clothing and equipment when engaged in a specified work process, or who may be at risk from such a process

a) Head protection (safety helmets, hair protection);

b) Hearing protection;

c) Face and eye protection (goggles and spectacles, facial shields)

d) Respiratory protective equipment (dust masks, respirators, breathing apparatus)

e) Hand and foot protection (gloves, safety boots and shoes);

f) Body protection (safety suits, safety belts, harnesses, aprons);

iii. HSE Department of MAG factory must approve all PPE maintained in stock. Where appropriate, all PPE must comply with approved standards and all items must be marked with the standard to which they conform.

iv. The Material Catalogue lists all items of PPE available as stock items. Any PPE not held as a stock item must be approved by the HSE Department prior to being purchased.

v. All personnel who may be required to use protective equipment should be properly trained in its use and advised of its limitations.

vi. The basic minimum PPE comprises helmet, protective footwear, coverall, gloves and dust/cartridge mask must be worn at all times when working within warehouse, or production lines.

vii. PPE for specific must be used when required. i.e. safety harness, respiratory equipment,, hearing protection, hand protection from hazardous substances and special eyes protection such as full-face shields or googles.

viii. All workers who are working at height, or in any other area where there is a risk of falling more than 3 metres, should wear a safety harness attached to a lifeline.

ix. Risk assessments should be conducted to establish the requirements for PPE above the basic minimum.

x. The marking and maintenance of PPE must be in compliance with the manufacturer’s instructions, or in such a way that the materials or methods do not affect the integrity of the equipment.

xi. If a person is not able to wear PPE when required due to injury or sickness, then he may be given alternative work where PPE is not required.

xii. The correct maintenance of PPE is responsibility of the person to whom is issued. Where the PPE may have multiple users, the relevant department manager will set up an internal system for the examination and correct storage/maintenance of the PPE.

xiii. HSE supervisor inspects each item of protective equipment at regular intervals and in all cases before and after use. He should ensure that the equipment is kept clean and disinfected as and when necessary for health reasons. Personal protective clothing and equipment should always be checked by the wearer each time before use.

xiv. Each department will maintain records of the issue of PPE to individuals. Department Managers may use the form for PPE Issuance.

9.4.2`Head Protection

Safety helmet is required to be used all times whilst at work with the exception of those areas within the factory which have been deemed not to pose a risk of injury through the non-wearing of such PPE, having been assessed by the Risk Assessment process.

Safety helmet are normally manufactured from an acetate butyrate styrene (abs) plastic.

9.4.3 Eyes Protection

Eye Shield

Also referred to as over spectacles, these are often a one-piece wrap-around polycarbonate protector manufactured to meet how energy impact levels, designed to be larger enough to fit over the top of person's own prescription glasses.

Goggles

There are basically two types of goggles, panoramic with a curved lens and a wide field of vision or more traditional box type.

Goggles are available to guard impact against chemical splash, dusts and gases and can often be multi-purposes. In the main they are manufactured to meet EN 166 medium energy impact levels and an alpha numeric system of marking on both housing and the lens us used to indicate their purpose and impact resistance level as follows.

a) CHEMICALS 3

b) DUSTS 4

c) GASES 5

d) MOLTEN METAL 8

e) LOW ENERGY IMPACT F

f) MEDIUM ENERGY IMPACT B

Googles with varying degrees of green filter are also available for welding and similar processes. Manufactured to meet the requirements of EN 166 they are intended to provide protection against ultraviolet, strong light sources and are suitable for use only for short period.

9.4.4 Face screen/visors

These provide protection for both the face and eyes, and are usually manufactured to meet the requirements of EN 166 to either medium energy impact resistance or the new high energy impact resistance.

9.4.5 Respiratory Protection

i. In general, respiratory protection can be summarily classified into three types.

a) Disposable dust masks

b) Negative pressure respirators

c) Positive pressure respirators

ii. It is important to obtain and use the right type to achieve the maximum protection against a respiratory hazard. Always ensure that the exact nature of the hazard has been identified and that all equipment meets with appropriate EN standards.

iii. Many disposable dusk masks can be used only for protection against non-toxic nuisance dusts. They often little or no protection against fumes, gases and vapours. 

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